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John&Joey

Some Location

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Posted: 01/17/12 03:59am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Where you went wrong is when you find out that your roof is leaking, your tires need to be replaced, or that last long pull blew your transmission, oh yeah you also need new brakes and your fridge doesn't seem to keep a chill.

A 1995 is close to 20 years old, you really think you're going to drive the thing with just normal maintenance. That is where you're going wrong. With a hotel you drop off the key and check out, with an old MH you do much more then that. If you want to RV and have a hobby, then that is another thing all together.

snowdance

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Posted: 01/17/12 05:08am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One thing I notice is the trailer people talk about the problems of backing in, hooking up sewer, water, electric ect. We towed our Airstream for 20 years and full timed for 10 years so I do understand.

Truth is with our small motorhome when we are traveling and park any place we may hook up the sewer to dump gray water and I may top of the fresh water or not. I seldom dunp the black water more than every 3 or 4 days as travel cleans the tank. As far as electric there is no real need as we are driving the next day anyway so just run off the batterys. We have no problems going 3 or 4 days with no hookups. And backing our little 25 foot over all rig into an spot has never been a problem for my wife or me. So even when staying in one spot for a week and driving it around to sight see or shop I may hook up twice. Not at all like the old trailer that had to be hooked and level every time.


Snowdance

We spent most of our money traveling... Just wasted the rest..

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PackerBacker

Montreal (Qc) Adirondacks (NY) Myrtle Beach (SC)

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Posted: 01/17/12 05:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It's a lifestyle decision. If anyone needs to justify the cost of having a motorhome from an ROI or cost efficieny perspective then they should be looking for a new hobby.


Eric
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turninghawk

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Posted: 01/17/12 05:34am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Davehrn wrote:

One word : BEDBUGS

worth every penny


Gotta love it.

After over 41 years of extensive traveling, in all 50 states and over 60 (probably a lot more) foreign countries, at least 60-70% of the nights spent in hotels, my wife and I have never, ever, encountered a bedbug problem.

How many have you personally encountered, or is this just a jump on the bandwagon?

We'd never limit our travels to places we could go in either motorhome just because of this alleged world-wide epidemic of bedbugs.

Don't get me wrong, we absolutely love RVing, and realize that this is an RV forum, but there's a lot more in this world to see in places your RV just won't go....

Michael in MN

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Posted: 01/17/12 06:54am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

if a person really wanted to know which was cheaper, you'd have to consider quite a bit more than just trip expenses. For example - mechanical things like RVs depreciate, need maintenance, and need to be scrapped & re-purchased periodically.

In some ways this is like comparing home ownership vs renting. When my house hit 25yrs and I ended up replacing siding, roof, furnace, AC and a deck all in a three year period, home ownership got expensive.

FWIW - I'd guess that traveling in a fuel efficient car, camping in a tent at state parks, and cooking meals at waysides will be the cheapest travel by far. You can make a pretty decent pasta with bolognese sauce at a rest stop in Montana.


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Floridastorm

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Posted: 01/17/12 08:15am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To all that are stating that I should consider a new hobby or something similar if I am balancing the costs related to car utilization for traveling versus RV utilization for traveling, I think you are missing my point. Since I have not had a motor home for years I was simply trying to figure, in today's market, what costs to budget for when owning and traveling in a small Class C motor home. Since I am on a fixed income I believe it should be just a natural exercise to figure out what this venture is going to cost in the long run. I have already learned a lot from the few messages provided on this forum. After all, knowledge is the most important ingredient for attempting anything in life. The more you know the better your decisions.

Since I have owned a motor home in the past(about 20 years ago)I am somewhat familiar with the finer or not so finer aspects of RVing, although I did not use the motor home very much since I was always on projects worldwide while still working. I am aware of the initial purchase cost, insurance and registration costs, upkeep costs, etc. These are all expenses that are similar to owning a car or truck except that motor home expenses can be greater. I'm also familiar with the hooking up and unhooking drill in RV parks. I am not familiar with overnight parking in places like Walmart as I never did that while traveling. It seems that this is more common today than it was 20 years ago.

If, through the various helpful messages on this forum, I decide to go forward and purchase a motor home, then I will be fully aware of what to expect in the way of expenses and will accept it.

Floridastorm

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Posted: 01/17/12 08:34am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Michael in MN wrote:

if a person really wanted to know which was cheaper, you'd have to consider quite a bit more than just trip expenses. For example - mechanical things like RVs depreciate, need maintenance, and need to be scrapped & re-purchased periodically.

In some ways this is like comparing home ownership vs renting. When my house hit 25yrs and I ended up replacing siding, roof, furnace, AC and a deck all in a three year period, home ownership got expensive.

FWIW - I'd guess that traveling in a fuel efficient car, camping in a tent at state parks, and cooking meals at waysides will be the cheapest travel by far. You can make a pretty decent pasta with bolognese sauce at a rest stop in Montana.


Michael..................

If I purchase, let's say, a 1995 Class C motor home for $10,000, it is within the NADA guide's pricing, and I maintain the motor home on a regular basis, I would think that in a few years that this motor home, if sold, would sell for approximately the same price. From what I have seen, with my researching, is that brand new motor homes depreciate greatly within the first year and into possibly the 5th year. The older the motor home gets it seems as though the pricing remains pretty stable. Of course the motor home has to be well maintained and kept clean as a whistle. There will always be people out there who will pay the price for a good older motor home. At least that is how I see it. In some ways this is similar to buying a house where the house does not depreciate in value after it reaches a certain age, even in today's horrible market.

That being said, and if I am correct, then the original investment in a motor home is a good one. If you utilize your car to go on vacations and stay at hotels and eat out, then when you return you have spent a lot of money that is in a sense down the drain. Very similar to what you have said about renting versus buying. If I look at the purchase of a motor home as an investment then it totally changes things.

snowdance

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Posted: 01/17/12 08:36am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good for you. Hope you enjoy it as much as we do. We also traveled world wide and RVed when things were different. Now its much easier Than 20 years back.

turninghawk

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Posted: 01/17/12 08:58am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Floridastorm wrote:

Michael in MN wrote:

if a person really wanted to know which was cheaper, you'd have to consider quite a bit more than just trip expenses. For example - mechanical things like RVs depreciate, need maintenance, and need to be scrapped & re-purchased periodically.

In some ways this is like comparing home ownership vs renting. When my house hit 25yrs and I ended up replacing siding, roof, furnace, AC and a deck all in a three year period, home ownership got expensive.

FWIW - I'd guess that traveling in a fuel efficient car, camping in a tent at state parks, and cooking meals at waysides will be the cheapest travel by far. You can make a pretty decent pasta with bolognese sauce at a rest stop in Montana.


Michael..................

If I purchase, let's say, a 1995 Class C motor home for $10,000, it is within the NADA guide's pricing, and I maintain the motor home on a regular basis, I would think that in a few years that this motor home, if sold, would sell for approximately the same price. From what I have seen, with my researching, is that brand new motor homes depreciate greatly within the first year and into possibly the 5th year. The older the motor home gets it seems as though the pricing remains pretty stable. Of course the motor home has to be well maintained and kept clean as a whistle. There will always be people out there who will pay the price for a good older motor home. At least that is how I see it. In some ways this is similar to buying a house where the house does not depreciate in value after it reaches a certain age, even in today's horrible market.

That being said, and if I am correct, then the original investment in a motor home is a good one. If you utilize your car to go on vacations and stay at hotels and eat out, then when you return you have spent a lot of money that is in a sense down the drain. Very similar to what you have said about renting versus buying. If I look at the purchase of a motor home as an investment then it totally changes things.


What I don't see you factoring-in is upkeep and expenses, and believe me, a $10,000 motorhome that's 17-years-old to begin with is not going to have any mercy on your wallet when it comes to upkeep & repair. I'll bet you don't drive a 17-year-old car, but if you did you'd know what I mean. Just multiply that expense many times when you strap a complete house onto a chassis! Just something else to consider.

Here'n'There

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Posted: 01/17/12 09:31am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I did the "math" - matter of fact I TAUGHT middle school math and high school algebra and geometry as a short second career.

After 3 full years of fulltiming I can say without reservation or further reflection that moving about the country and "living" in a "RV" is MORE expensive than living in a comparably sized (ie SMALL)house or condo. I assume that the RV and / or house-condo are paid for.

I agree with those that have said that moving about the country / living in an RV is more of a lifestyle choice than it is financial. Living in a RV is sometimes a challenge, an adventure at times, fun, convenient, comfortable, relaxing, and not very often, but sometimes a royal pain you know where.

So, if cost is the only consideration - take a bus.


Here'n'There
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