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Topic: Cross winds and Class C

Posted By: MSGMadhatter on 02/18/11 10:26am

I have been pulling a 34' TT, 8K lbs/ with a 4dr, 6L, 1500HD PU.
Cross winds never bother it.

Now I am driving a Class C, 25', Jayco Greyhawk, 2003, 8.1 L eng.,
GWT 12,300. I have all new 8 ply tires.

These cross winds in OK & TX nearly blow me off the road. I have to drive 55 $ no more than 60mph.

Are the longer, 29-31' Class C Rvs this bad in the wind???


MSG MADHATTER (Life Member Good Sam)
1500 HD Silverado, 6L
Jayco Eagle Super Light 298RLDS (Hers)
Jayco Greyhawk 24SS Class C (His)


Posted By: pnichols on 02/18/11 10:49am

Quote:

Now I am driving a Class C, 25', Jayco Greyhawk, 2003, 8.1 L eng., GWT 12,300. I have all new 8 ply tires.


Is it on the E350 or E450 Ford chassis?

BTW, do you have an awning lock on your rig? Strong cross winds can start unfurling your awning with possible disastrous results ... I know from experience ... but was lucky to catch it early in strong Arizona cross-winds.

We definitely feel strong cross winds in our 24 foot E450 Class C, but certain chassis differences between the E350 and E450 make cross wind effects more tolerable with the E450 under a small Class C.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca 324V Spirit


Posted By: JDMACD on 02/18/11 10:55am

After purchasing it in Arizona, I drove our 31' Greyhawk through high winds on Oklahoma and Texas (and on to Toronto) last October. I was actually suprised at how easy it was to drive in the crosswinds. We have the F450 chasis.


Posted By: ron.dittmer on 02/18/11 11:14am

Our 2007 E350 handles crosswinds so much better after we had the suspension upgrades I've mentioned in other posts. It is a night/day difference.


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow



Posted By: Harvard on 02/18/11 12:20pm

My experiences with a 28 Foot Ford E450 would suggest:

"When you drive your E350/E450 on a windy day WITHOUT enough +CASTER you will be fighting both the wind and the RV. When you drive the same rig in a similiar circumstance WITH enough +CASTER the RV will fight the wind, all you need to do is manage the situation."

How much +CASTER will do the job? IMHO, greater then +5.0 degrees, +7.3 is the max recommended for the Ford E450.

Will it help your Chev, I dont know but if you ever find out let us know.


Posted By: MSGMadhatter on 02/18/11 12:50pm

Reply to chasis?

The Greyhawk is on a Chevrolet Express 3500 chasis.

Any Chevy drivers now or in the past.


Posted By: timwood on 02/18/11 01:19pm

IMO there is a big difference between a tow rig/tt (or even better: 5th wheel) and a class C in cross winds...my first experience was down right shocking! Furthermore, I think some people are much more sensitive to it than others.
I used to have a 30' Class C, and now I have a 22', and both have serious cross wind issues for me. My good friend has a 28' foot C, and said, "I've spent over $5K on upgrades to my suspension, cross winds don't phase me." So I drove his....it handled EXACTLY like mine!!!!
There is a good side to all this though: you get used to it. Now that I've driven several thousand miles, it doesn't bother me nearly as much.
Tim


.



Posted By: Rolin on 02/18/11 02:22pm

Hi MSGMadhatter,
We purchased a used 23ft Jayco Grayhawk (2003 Chev 3500 with 8.1 engine). It was much harder to drive than our previous RV (22ft 5th wheel). After a few trips we changed tires (upgraded to load range E) then loaded our gear in the Grayhawk and took it to a truck alignment shop. The alignment helped, but I also found that getting the right tire pressure combination (front and rear) was very helpful. Factory spec is 60lbs front and 65lbs rear. Now running 65lbs front and 70lbs rear. Seems to be a good combination for handling and gas mileage. Still fight cross winds but not nearly as bad and it tracks better. We tend to cruise at around 60mph for comfort and mileage. I'm sure there are other changes that could improve handling, but feel it is safe and handles ok. Think I will spend that money on gas..."going to see the USA in my Chevrolet"

* This post was edited 02/18/11 02:39pm by Rolin *


Posted By: mumkin on 02/18/11 03:04pm

MSGMadhatter wrote:

Reply to chasis?

The Greyhawk is on a Chevrolet Express 3500 chasis.

Any Chevy drivers now or in the past.

Does this depend on year? I am looking right now at photos of a 2004 Grayhawk for sale on the web and it is a Ford. Maybe our OP needs to tell us for sure?


Mumkin
2011 LTV Libero



Posted By: Harvard on 02/18/11 03:13pm

Rolin wrote:

Hi MSGMadhatter,
We purchased a used 23ft Jayco Grayhawk (2003 Chev 3500 with 8.1 engine). It was much harder to drive than our previous RV (22ft 5th wheel). After a few trips we changed tires (upgraded to load range E) then loaded our gear in the Grayhawk and took it to a truck alignment shop. The alignment helped, but I also found that getting the right tire pressure combination (front and rear) was very helpful. Factory spec is 60lbs front and 65lbs rear. Now running 65lbs front and 70lbs rear. Seems to be a good combination for handling and gas mileage. Still fight cross winds but not nearly as bad and it tracks better. We tend to cruise at around 60mph for comfort and mileage. I'm sure there are other changes that could improve handling, but feel it is safe and handles ok. Think I will spend that money on gas..."going to see the USA in my Chevrolet"


To assist readers make an informed decision regarding this thread I have updated my profile to hopefully add creditability to my recommendation that you should seriously look into the CASTER setting on your front wheels.

Do you have an alignment report from your alignment? If so, please inform us as to the content of that report, it would be most helpful. I hope I am not being too cheesy about this, but I think it is important in the pursuit of getting the most enjoyment possible from our RVs.


Posted By: Rolin on 02/18/11 05:43pm

Hi Harvard,
I did not save any alignment details for my Jayco Grayhawk. From memory the alignment shop indicated that at the factory the cut away chassis used on Class C motor homes have a fixture that is used (and left attached to the front end) to allow the assembly line person to set up the front end alignment. It is just sort of centered. When the Motorhome manufacturer adds the body to the cut away chassis (significant weight change) no change is made to alignment. I believe that camber was the main adjustment made by the alignment shop. He centered the steering wheel and told me that if the steering wheel was ever out of center to come back as that would indicate that the alignment had changed.

There wasn't any shimmy or unusual tread wear...just a tendency to wander. Made driving somewhat tiresome. Alignment helped and I would recommend it to anyone who buys new or used. Its not expensive. The front end on my used Grayhawk had never been aligned because it still had the factory stuff attached. The shop removed it during the adjustment process.

I'm sure there are other things like significant side to side or front to back weight imbalance that may also impact driveability.


Posted By: Harvard on 02/18/11 07:31pm

Rolin wrote:

Hi Harvard,
I did not save any alignment details for my Jayco Grayhawk. From memory the alignment shop indicated that at the factory the cut away chassis used on Class C motor homes have a fixture that is used (and left attached to the front end) to allow the assembly line person to set up the front end alignment. It is just sort of centered. When the Motorhome manufacturer adds the body to the cut away chassis (significant weight change) no change is made to alignment. I believe that camber was the main adjustment made by the alignment shop. He centered the steering wheel and told me that if the steering wheel was ever out of center to come back as that would indicate that the alignment had changed.

There wasn't any shimmy or unusual tread wear...just a tendency to wander. Made driving somewhat tiresome. Alignment helped and I would recommend it to anyone who buys new or used. Its not expensive. The front end on my used Grayhawk had never been aligned because it still had the factory stuff attached. The shop removed it during the adjustment process.

I'm sure there are other things like significant side to side or front to back weight imbalance that may also impact driveability.


You have stated "just a tendency to wander" which is a classic symptom of not having enough + CASTER. When you add a wind to the equation you have a real fight on your hands.

The "off center" steering wheel is corrected by adjusting both LH and RH toe buckles in opposite directions to recenter. On the Ford E Series cutaway vans, a good alignment will include the replacement of the fixed Ford factory CASTER/CAMBER sleeves with adjustable sleeves such as Ingalls 594 concentric adjustable sleeves. (see the document 59400.pdf for reference material on these 3rd party sleeves).

The Ford E Series has a specified CASTER range of:
LH 4.00 +/- 2.75 Degrees
RH 4.50 +/- 2.75 Degrees

I firmly believe, when this driveability issue finally comes out in the wash, and this is just my opinion, the orginal engineering specification was meant to be NOT "+ or -", just "+" as in LH 4.00 +2.75/-0.0.

In other words you want to be on the high end of the range from the fixed center for a consistant satisfactory driveability.

If you want more reading material which is very recent do a search of "caster" on this forum.

Thank you for coming back to us with your experience and observations.


Posted By: Harvard on 02/19/11 08:00am

Another point I would like to make, should you decide to approach an alignment shop. If you have a vehicle that wanders, (which in turn becomes a bear in windy conditions), make sure you are clear in stating to them that you want to have them apply more + CASTER (that will still end up within the specified range). It is not good enough to just accept a "wandering" unit that has a CASTER that is within the specified range, if you get my drift.


Posted By: Westronics on 02/18/11 01:02pm

Take it for what it is worth:

I found that Airtabs make a big difference in getting blown around by cross winds.


2002 Jayco Greyhawk 24SS, Camera, ScanGauge, Inverter, Airtabs, Portabote, SeeLevel II, Tireman valves, Xatnrex Battery Monitor, Aero-flo vent, Trik-L-Start, XPS Rib, Chains, Lil' Stanker, Be kind to septic systems Ford: 1-800-444-3311. RV Tires



Posted By: Rolin on 02/19/11 10:54am

Hi Harvard,
Thanks for the information this has been very educational for me.

Caster was a bit difficult for me to visualize until I went to this website: http://www.d26.net/240sx/mirrors/Whiteline_WheelAlignmentTermsAndTheory.htm.

I now believe that there are many motorhome owners who might have saved them selves a lot of money spent on suspension products if they just had positive Caster applied first (not knocking the benefit of suspension products). A Nissan racing forum and Whiteline has the following opinion on Caster:

Caster- 5 reasons why more is good
* Maximise tyre contact patch during roll
* Improve turn-in response
* Increase directional stability
* Maximise tyre contact patch during braking and acceleration
* Improved steering feel and self-centre
* Increases dynamic negative camber (on turn)

Why too much Camber is bad
* Camber doesn’t improve turn-in, positive caster does.
* Camber is not good for tyre wear.
* Camber doesn’t improve directional stability.
* Camber adversely effects braking and acceleration.

I believe that handling on my Jayco motorhome can be further improved with a little more positive Caster and there are probably a lot more of us out there with wandering (in the bad sense) motorhomes who could benefit from a little more Caster. I'm going to give it a try later this year.


Posted By: oldtrucker63 on 02/19/11 11:19am

This is the deferents in Pulling a trailer and driving a high profile Vehicle, When your pulling a trailer the wind is still doing the same thing to the trailer You just can't feel it like you can driving the high profile Vehicle.


Without Trucks,....America Stop's


Posted By: Harvard on 02/19/11 11:20am

pokey...thanks for your input Rolin


Posted By: Texas TC on 02/19/11 12:21pm

I fought the cross wind issues for a year with a Kodiak chassis. I installed a safe steer device and it did not help. The folks I sold the coach to added a Henderson track bar and said it did wonders in improving handling.

I have been driving a class 6 chassis Super C for the past 44,000 miles and the difference is night and day. I no longer have any wandering or difficult driving issues in cross winds or around other high profile vehicles. I hope you all can find a good fix for those lighter duty chassis but, for me, the class 6 is the way to go if you want a comfortable drive in all kinds of conditions.


2011 Journey Express
2011 Chevy Texas Edition Silverado 4X4 Extended Cab (In Tow)



Posted By: pnichols on 02/19/11 04:23pm

Elmer,

Your comments on more positive Caster to improve tracking/steering on Class C motorhomes may have to do with the Ford E350/E450 chassis than the Chevy chassis.

Note that the Ford's have that twin I-beam suspension, where the Chevys probably have the more common coil-spring/A-arm front end arrangement (like my GMC PU). Two completely different animals, here, with the twin I-Beam design probably having some good and some no-so-good merits. Your excellent information about needing +Caster near the end of the factory spec for better tracking with the twin I-beam design is, IMHO, one of it's compromise (bad) characteristics.


Posted By: snowdance on 02/19/11 04:55pm

High winds are common here in the Shasta Valley of Calif as those that have driven I-5 between Yreka and Weed know. We have got a 2000 Jamboree 23B on a Chevy 3500 w/7.4L (454) with 21000 miles on it. It had a front Hellwig 1 3/8 sway bar when we got it. I changed the front shocks and added a Hellwig rear sway bar. I also run our tires 5 lbs over called for pressures.

We drove home a week ago in 35 to 40 mph gusting to 45 - 50 mph cross winds and did well. But did not go over 60 mph. We were on a narrow 2 lane road with about 1 foot of gravel sholder and often 20 to 50 foot drops.. No place to get blown around. It did great. The double action front shocks in place of the single action stock shocks made a difference in ride but did not change the handle much. The rear sway bar made a world of difference.

I am going to leave things as they are now for this summer except to replace two tires next month when they go on sale.


Snowdance

We spent most of our money traveling... Just wasted the rest..

Chevy 7.4 Vortex
2000 Jamboree 23b Rear Kitchen

http://www.flickr.com/photos/snowdance38



Posted By: Harvard on 02/19/11 09:06pm

pnichols wrote:

Elmer,

Your comments on more positive Caster to improve tracking/steering on Class C motorhomes may have to do with the Ford E350/E450 chassis than the Chevy chassis.

Note that the Ford's have that twin I-beam suspension, where the Chevys probably have the more common coil-spring/A-arm front end arrangement (like my GMC PU). Two completely different animals, here, with the twin I-Beam design probably having some good and some no-so-good merits. Your excellent information about needing +Caster near the end of the factory spec for better tracking with the twin I-beam design is, IMHO, one of it's compromise (bad) characteristics.


Yes, I agree. I only have CASTER adjustment experience with one particular 2004 E450 and I acknowledge I was dealt a very black and white hand. There is a lot of grey area between my two CASTER start and end points where I have no personal experience. Thank you for taking the time to compose your valued opinion.


Posted By: Gene in NE on 02/19/11 09:56pm

MSGMadhatter wrote:

...Now I am driving a Class C, 25', Jayco Greyhawk, 2003, 8.1 L eng.,GWT 12,300. I have all new 8 ply tires.

These cross winds in OK & TX nearly blow me off the road...
That 8.1L engine must mean you are driving a Chevy. It is unusual for a Chevy to have wandering problems. Our 22.5' Chevy never fusses in a wind. I also doubt a 25' has much of an overhang. There is the ratio of wheelbase divided by overall length that makes handling a problem if close to 52% or worse. The tail wags the dog when driving down the road if the ratio is small. I would suspect weak tire sidewalls or alignment problems. Over pressure in the tires could cause the tires to loose some of their "stiction" because of a smaller contact patch. Take your RV when loaded over the scales and adjust air pressure based on the weight. Then, while loaded, take to a good front end shop and have front end aligned.


2002 Trail-Lite Model 211-S w/5.7 Chevy (click View Profile)
Gene


Posted By: pnichols on 02/20/11 12:21am

Also regarding lateral (sideways) stability feeling of Class C rigs based on the Ford E350 chassis or E450 chassis: Note that the E450 has a 4.5 inch wider track in the rear than the E350 does ... in other words the rear dual sets are spaced 4.5 inches more apart ... giving a wider "stance".

This will make the E450 feel "more solid" in curves, when semi-trucks pass, and in side winds.


Posted By: MSGMadhatter on 02/20/11 09:30am

Omaha,

The Chevy doesn't wander, it drives like a dream until I get in a hard cross wind. I usually drive it with one hand. In a cross wind 20-30 mph I HAVE TO KEEP both hands planted on the steering wheel.

After you drive in bad cross wind it takes me 20 or so miles to get use to it.


Posted By: mumkin on 02/20/11 10:54am

MSGMadhatter wrote:

In a cross wind 20-30 mph I HAVE TO KEEP both hands planted on the steering wheel.

Just curious here... but are there any vehicles larger than a sports car that don't require two hands on the wheel with 20-30 mph crosswinds. It's true of my minivan though unlike my old Ford based B-Class, I don't have to slow down to under 60 (often under 50!!)


Posted By: Westronics on 02/20/11 11:49am

MSGMadhatter wrote:

Omaha,

The Chevy doesn't wander, it drives like a dream until I get in a hard cross wind. I usually drive it with one hand. In a cross wind 20-30 mph I HAVE TO KEEP both hands planted on the steering wheel.

After you drive in bad cross wind it takes me 20 or so miles to get use to it.


20-30 mph cross-winds is HUGE. I have the same model rig (except on a Ford chassis), and I definitely need two hands under those conditions. Remember, you are driving a non-aerodynamic box!

Still, there are things you can do to make it somewhat better, though your expectations may not be realistic.


Posted By: pnichols on 02/20/11 07:55pm

Quote:

20-30 mph cross-winds is HUGE


We had cross-winds up to 60 mph on the high deserts of Arizona in the summer of 2009. It was those winds that I had in mind above when I mentioned the need for awning locks to keep the awning from unfurling in ABSURD/OBSCENE cross-winds. Our friends driving immediately ahead of us had the spare tire cover ripped right off the spare and lost the cover as it went flying across the desert"! (They also had their awning start to unfurl - about the same time as ours.)

With 60 mph cross-winds in our small Class C on our normally "overkill" E450 chassis I of course had to have both hands on the steering wheel. However, normally our 24 foot Class C can "be driven with one hand on the steering wheel" ... if I wanted too ... but I don't as I consider this unsafe RV driving practice, with or without cross-winds.


Posted By: Pokey2 on 02/21/11 10:55am

pnichols wrote:

With 60 mph cross-winds in our small Class C on our normally "overkill" E450 chassis I of course had to have both hands on the steering wheel. However, normally our 24 foot Class C can "be driven with one hand on the steering wheel" ... if I wanted too ... but I don't as I consider this unsafe RV driving practice, with or without cross-winds.


Unless I absolutely had to get somewhere at a given time, no way would I drive my RV in 60 MPH crosswinds. Several years ago my son and I, on motorcycles, were headed up I-5 in CA trying to get home that night. The crosswind was a bear, and I finally said “uncle”; we stopped at a motel. I later learned that one of those big car carriers had been blown over nearby that night.

And I agree, whether driving my RV or my car, two hands on the wheel at all times is the rule, regardless of winds.


Posted By: lmatch on 05/31/11 02:42pm

Harvard, if you are still following this thread, I have a 2004 E450 27' class C, and it wanders (especially with a cross wind). On your advise, I just took in in to Les Schwab Tire center for alignment check, and to request more + CASTER. The fellow told me it had +4.00 already, and any more would negatively affect the CAMBER. Hmm.. is this because I need to invest in those adjustable sleeves you mentioned?


Posted By: Harvard on 05/31/11 09:10pm

lmatch wrote:

Harvard, if you are still following this thread, I have a 2004 E450 27' class C, and it wanders (especially with a cross wind). On your advise, I just took in in to Les Schwab Tire center for alignment check, and to request more + CASTER. The fellow told me it had +4.00 already, and any more would negatively affect the CAMBER. Hmm.. is this because I need to invest in those adjustable sleeves you mentioned?


If there is only one sleeve then it means to get more caster you would also change the camber. Personally I would take the +caster and sacrifice the camber if I had to make the choice. The dual concentric sleeves (Ingalls 594s) allow for individual camber and caster settings. In my opinion +4.00 caster is not enough and is contributing to the wandering, try to get at least +5.3 caster or more (+7.3 is the top of the recommended range).


Posted By: lmatch on 05/31/11 10:50pm

Thanks Harvard! I'll give that a shot. BTW, are you currently up by Calgary, or is that just where you were when you created the profile? Looks like a nice area to RV to..


Posted By: Harvard on 06/01/11 09:34pm

lmatch wrote:

Thanks Harvard! I'll give that a shot. BTW, are you currently up by Calgary, or is that just where you were when you created the profile? Looks like a nice area to RV to..

We live 45 miles, as the crow flies, NW of Calgary. Yes, if you have a US passport for your return trip home it would be a nice trip. I would hate to see anyone who wants to have more +caster on their E350/450 not get it just because most alignment shops hate serving customers who know what they want. As an alignment tech at a chain outlet they must look real good at head office when they can do 6 to 8 alignments per day.


Posted By: Harvard on 08/10/11 09:34am

ron.dittmer wrote:

After our first trip with our brand new 2007 E350 chassis motor home, I took it to This Shop where my first motor home was made right 12 years earlier.


This company, Champion Frame-Align, is located in the industrial heartland of America (Elgin, IL). A quote from their website:

"At Champion Frame-Align we are proud of our nationwide reputation for solving suspension, alignment and steering-related issues, which have stumped others, on recreational vehicles, trucks, trailers and cars.".

In hindsight, I too would trust them to solve my E450 handling problems but it would be a very expensive trip from Calgary to Elgin, IL. You IL folks are very fortunate to be located in the midst of such talented resources.


Posted By: Tech Dude on 08/10/11 03:07pm

I have the same rig as Rons
I have not done any thing
maybe because I have had vans
since the early 70s
also had a few VWs


Posted By: Handbasket on 08/10/11 03:16pm

Tech Dude, What specific tires does yours ride on?

Jim, "Strip mining prevents forest fires."


'06 Tiger CX 'C Minus' on a Silverado 2500HD 4x4, 8.1 & Allison (aka 'Loafer's Glory') www.tigervehicles.com


Posted By: Po6ept on 08/06/11 02:03pm

I have a 1998 E350 Dutchman 26Q that was a terror to drive over 55 mph. I took it to alignment shops multiple times. The last one decreased the caster instead of increasing it and convinced me that the alignment was correct.

I installed Hellwig sway bars, Bilstein shocks, new ball joints, tie rods and ends, wheel bearings, etc. Each change gave a little improvement, but the coach still handled poorly and my wife refused to drive it.

I was lucky to stumble across Harvard's comments on a couple of forums. His advice made sense, so I decided to try fixing it myself.

I bought a set of alignment bushings. They are sold as INGALLS 594, Specialty Products 24180, Spicer 6122025, NAPA NCP 264-3950, and Superlift SLF-1120. I emailed Harvard for additional advice and he was kind enough to help me understand even more. It took less than 30 minutes to replace the bushings on both sides, setting the caster to the maximum with zero degrees of camber.

One word, REMARKABLE!

The coach now tracks straight and true at 70-75 mph and passing trucks are no longer a problem. I am amazed that such a simple change fixed the problem.

If your E350/E450 based coach wanders, feels like the wheels each have a mind of their own, will not track correctly, darts across the lane with every passing truck, or is just exhausting to drive, please do yourself a favor and ask your alignment shop to add more positive caster before you start buying suspension upgrades.

Many thanks to Harvard for his help. I was ready to sell my coach and am now looking forward to my next trip.

* This post was last edited 08/06/11 11:35pm by Po6ept *


Posted By: claudalfa on 08/06/11 05:13pm

With our 2008 Winnebago View build on a Sprinter chassis, we usually slow down to 55 when high winds are present and never had problem with awning, but I will get a tie down system just in case. Thanks for the advice


Posted By: rockhillmanor on 08/06/11 05:46pm

timwood wrote:

IMO there is a big difference between a tow rig/tt (or even better: 5th wheel) and a class C in cross winds...my first experience was down right shocking! Furthermore, I think some people are much more sensitive to it than others.
I used to have a 30' Class C, and now I have a 22', and both have serious cross wind issues for me. My good friend has a 28' foot C, and said, "I've spent over $5K on upgrades to my suspension, cross winds don't phase me." So I drove his....it handled EXACTLY like mine!!!!
There is a good side to all this though: you get used to it. Now that I've driven several thousand miles, it doesn't bother me nearly as much.
Tim

I experienced just the opposite. I dumped my TT because I got tired of white knuckle trips and being sidelined with wind and bad weather. Bought a MH.
3 years later and it still makes me smile as I plow thru cross winds and bad weather with my 31 ft. I just got back from down south and for 2 entire days of travel the winds were in excess of 40 mph. I drove with one hand on the steering wheel and had no problem.

After reading years of posts of handling problmes, I'm starting to think I just got real lucky with my MH I don't have any steering problems or ride problems. The only thing I did to it was new Monroe RVshocks and new leaf springs plus one. She rides rock solid and is a pleasure to drive in all weather conditions.


"We must be willing to get rid of the life we've planned,
so as to have the life that is waiting for us".



Posted By: Harvard on 08/07/11 07:36pm

rockhillmanor wrote:

After reading years of posts of handling problmes, I'm starting to think I just got real lucky with my MH I don't have any steering problems or ride problems. The only thing I did to it was new Monroe RVshocks and new leaf springs plus one. She rides rock solid and is a pleasure to drive in all weather conditions.


...and I for one am dying to know what your front end caster might be set at?


Posted By: ron.dittmer on 08/07/11 07:50pm

Po6ept wrote:

If your E350/E450 based coach wanders, feels like the wheels each have a mind of their own, will not track correctly, darts across the lane with every passing truck, or is just exhausting to drive, please do yourself a favor and ask your alignment shop to add more positive caster before you start buying suspension upgrades.
After our first trip with our brand new 2007 E350 chassis motor home, I took it to This Shop where my first motor home was made right 12 years earlier. They did as you did, and after 4 years and 15,000 miles, I am still extremely well pleased, worth every penny of the $3900 spent for both comfort and safety.

But I feel it is "Everything In Combination" that made the difference. Not one thing alone. This is what I had done.

- heavy duty motor home shocks (Koni)
- front & rear heavy duty stabilizer bars (Roadmaster)
- rear trac bar (Henderson)
- heavy duty front steering stabilizer (Safe-T-Plus)
- front alignment with offset bushings to correct an extreme camber


Posted By: Tech Dude on 08/10/11 10:46pm

Firestones have over 80k on them 2002 e 350


Posted By: Harvard on 09/03/11 07:24pm

rockhillmanor wrote:

After reading years of posts of handling problmes, I'm starting to think I just got real lucky with my MH I don't have any steering problems or ride problems. The only thing I did to it was new Monroe RVshocks and new leaf springs plus one. She rides rock solid and is a pleasure to drive in all weather conditions.


Any chance of talking you into trying out our DIY caster measurement on your unit?

Guestimating E350/E450 Caster Settings


Posted By: oldtrucker63 on 09/04/11 06:42am

Westronics wrote:

Take it for what it is worth:

I found that Airtabs make a big difference in getting blown around by cross winds.
Yes air bags help a lot and are well worth the money, But from one windy day to the next makes a differents One day with the wind blowing 20 mph could be not as bad as a other day with the wind blowing at 35 or 40 mph, It is all cross winds but different from one day to the next, So if the wind hits you just right it can be bad in 10 mph gust and later in the day your hit with a gust at 40 mph and it would feel like it was 8 mph, The wind never blows on your vehicle the same.


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